Education

  • Northwestern University School of Law, J.D, cum laude, 2009. Editor in Chief, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, B.A., History and Romance Languages, 2001, and M.A., Teaching, 2002

Admissions

  • California, 2009
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T: 415-433-6830
F: 415-433-7104
E: KStone-Manista@rbgg.com

Krista Stone-Manista is an associate at Rosen Bien Galvan & Grunfeld LLP. She works on complex commercial and civil rights litigation matters, including business relationship disputes, wrongful death actions, and disability rights matters. Full bio »

vCard icon

Download vCard
T: 415-433-6830
F: 415-433-7104
E: KStone-Manista@rbgg.com

Krista Stone-Manista is an associate at Rosen Bien Galvan & Grunfeld LLP. She works on complex commercial and civil rights litigation matters, including business relationship disputes, wrongful death actions, and disability rights matters.

Ms. Stone-Manista is a graduate of Northwestern University School of Law and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, from which she has a B.A. and an M.A. Prior to joining RBGG, Ms. Stone-Manista was a Legal Fellow for the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois and served as a law clerk to the Honorable Virginia M. Kendall of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.

Prior to law school, Ms. Stone-Manista taught high school social studies in North Carolina. She has a long-standing interest in educational equality and access issues, particularly those affecting students with physical and learning disabilities. Ms. Stone-Manista is also particularly interested in legal issues affecting the Deaf and hard-of-hearing communities.

REPRESENTATIVE CASES
  •  Coleman v. Brown: RBGG represents a class of the more than 30,000 men and women in California’s prison system with serious mental illness. After a contested trial, the district court held that the prison mental health delivery system violates the Eighth Amendment and ordered systemwide injunctive relief. See Coleman v. Wilson, 912 F. Supp. 1282 (E.D. Cal. 1995). The court determined that the constitutional violations remain ongoing in 2013 after the State attempted to terminate the injunction. See Coleman v. Brown, 938 F. Supp. 2d 955 (E.D. Cal. 2013). Through hard-fought litigation over the last two decades, RBGG has secured a number of significant systemic changes on behalf of the class, including, most recently, reforms to policies and practices regarding the use of force against prisoners with mental illness, as well as the overuse and misuse of solitary confinement. See Coleman v. Brown, 28 F. Supp. 3d 1068 (E.D. Cal. 2014).
  • Hernandez v. County of Monterey: We sued the County of Monterey and its private medical provider, California Forensic Medical Group, challenging dangerous and unconstitutional conditions in the County’s Jail, a system plagued by severe overcrowding, outdated facilities, and chronic understaffing.  In 2014, we defeated the defendants’ motions to dismiss and obtained a unique ruling holding that our clients could assert ADA Title III claims against the Jail’s private medical provider.  See Hernandez v. County of Monterey, 70 F.Supp.3d 963 (N.D. Cal. 2014).  The federal court subsequently certified a class of the approximately 950 prisoners in the Jail, along with a sub-class of prisoners with disabilities.  See Hernandez v. County of Monterey, 305 F.R.D. 132 (N.D. Cal. 2015).  On April 14, 2015, the court granted a sweeping preliminary injunction on behalf of the class and sub-class, finding rampant violations of the Constitution and federal law.  See Hernandez v. County of Monterey, 110 F. Supp. 3d 929 (N.D. Cal. 2015). The court approved the parties’ settlement on August 18, 2015, which requires defendants to comply with the requirements of the preliminary injunction and to develop and implement a comprehensive set of plans to enhance services at the Jail.  In November 2015, the Court approved a $4.8 million dollar award of fees and costs to counsel for the plaintiff class.
  • Estate of Nunuha v. State of Hawaii: RBGG represented the mother and son of Bronson Nunuha, a young Hawaii prisoner who was brutally murdered at a Corrections Corporation of America private prison in Arizona, when two prison gang members entered his unlocked cell and stabbed him to death. The wrongful death lawsuit alleged that the death was preventable were it not for the prison’s inadequate security policies and practices, and the State of Hawaii’s lack of oversight. We obtained a confidential settlement in the case.
  • Estate of Medina v. State of Hawaii: RBGG represented the mother, sister, and two aunts of Clifford Medina, a young developmentally disabled Hawaii prisoner who was murdered by his cellmate at a Corrections Corporation of America private prison in Arizona, less than four months after Bronson Nunuha was killed in the same housing unit. The wrongful death lawsuit alleged that custody staff ignored clear warning signs that Clifford Medina was in danger, including threats made by the killer the day before the murder. We obtained a confidential settlement in the case.

Honors & Awards

  • Northern California Super Lawyers, 2016 Rising Star

Admissions

  • California, 2009

Professional Experience

  • Law Clerk for the Honorable Virginia M. Kendall, United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, 2009-2010
  • Legal Fellow, American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois, 2010–2012

Krista Stone-Manista is an associate at Rosen Bien Galvan & Grunfeld LLP. She works on complex commercial and civil rights litigation matters, including business relationship disputes, wrongful death actions, and disability rights matters.

Ms. Stone-Manista is a graduate of Northwestern University School of Law and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, from which she has a B.A. and an M.A. Prior to joining RBGG, Ms. Stone-Manista was a Legal Fellow for the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois and served as a law clerk to the Honorable Virginia M. Kendall of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.

Prior to law school, Ms. Stone-Manista taught high school social studies in North Carolina. She has a long-standing interest in educational equality and access issues, particularly those affecting students with physical and learning disabilities. Ms. Stone-Manista is also particularly interested in legal issues affecting the Deaf and hard-of-hearing communities.

REPRESENTATIVE CASES
  •  Coleman v. Brown: RBGG represents a class of the more than 30,000 men and women in California’s prison system with serious mental illness. After a contested trial, the district court held that the prison mental health delivery system violates the Eighth Amendment and ordered systemwide injunctive relief. See Coleman v. Wilson, 912 F. Supp. 1282 (E.D. Cal. 1995). The court determined that the constitutional violations remain ongoing in 2013 after the State attempted to terminate the injunction. See Coleman v. Brown, 938 F. Supp. 2d 955 (E.D. Cal. 2013). Through hard-fought litigation over the last two decades, RBGG has secured a number of significant systemic changes on behalf of the class, including, most recently, reforms to policies and practices regarding the use of force against prisoners with mental illness, as well as the overuse and misuse of solitary confinement. See Coleman v. Brown, 28 F. Supp. 3d 1068 (E.D. Cal. 2014).
  • Hernandez v. County of Monterey: We sued the County of Monterey and its private medical provider, California Forensic Medical Group, challenging dangerous and unconstitutional conditions in the County’s Jail, a system plagued by severe overcrowding, outdated facilities, and chronic understaffing.  In 2014, we defeated the defendants’ motions to dismiss and obtained a unique ruling holding that our clients could assert ADA Title III claims against the Jail’s private medical provider.  See Hernandez v. County of Monterey, 70 F.Supp.3d 963 (N.D. Cal. 2014).  The federal court subsequently certified a class of the approximately 950 prisoners in the Jail, along with a sub-class of prisoners with disabilities.  See Hernandez v. County of Monterey, 305 F.R.D. 132 (N.D. Cal. 2015).  On April 14, 2015, the court granted a sweeping preliminary injunction on behalf of the class and sub-class, finding rampant violations of the Constitution and federal law.  See Hernandez v. County of Monterey, 110 F. Supp. 3d 929 (N.D. Cal. 2015). The court approved the parties’ settlement on August 18, 2015, which requires defendants to comply with the requirements of the preliminary injunction and to develop and implement a comprehensive set of plans to enhance services at the Jail.  In November 2015, the Court approved a $4.8 million dollar award of fees and costs to counsel for the plaintiff class.
  • Estate of Nunuha v. State of Hawaii: RBGG represented the mother and son of Bronson Nunuha, a young Hawaii prisoner who was brutally murdered at a Corrections Corporation of America private prison in Arizona, when two prison gang members entered his unlocked cell and stabbed him to death. The wrongful death lawsuit alleged that the death was preventable were it not for the prison’s inadequate security policies and practices, and the State of Hawaii’s lack of oversight. We obtained a confidential settlement in the case.
  • Estate of Medina v. State of Hawaii: RBGG represented the mother, sister, and two aunts of Clifford Medina, a young developmentally disabled Hawaii prisoner who was murdered by his cellmate at a Corrections Corporation of America private prison in Arizona, less than four months after Bronson Nunuha was killed in the same housing unit. The wrongful death lawsuit alleged that custody staff ignored clear warning signs that Clifford Medina was in danger, including threats made by the killer the day before the murder. We obtained a confidential settlement in the case.

Education

  • Northwestern University School of Law, J.D, cum laude, 2009. Editor in Chief, Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, B.A., History and Romance Languages, 2001, and M.A., Teaching, 2002

Honors & Awards

  • Northern California Super Lawyers, 2016 Rising Star

Publications

  • “Parents in Illinois Are Parents in Oklahoma Too: An Argument for Mandatory Interstate Recognition of Same-Sex Adoptions,” 19 Tulane Journal of Law & Sexuality 137 (2010)
  • “In the Manner Prescribed by the State”: Potential Challenges to State-Enforced Hospital Limitations on Childbirth Options, 16 Cardozo Journal of Law & Gender 469 (2010)
  • Comment, “Protecting Pregnant Women: A Guide to Successfully Challenging Criminal Child Abuse Prosecutions of Pregnant Drug Addicts,” 99 Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology 823 (2009)
  • “Parents in Illinois Are Parents in Oklahoma Too: An Argument for Mandatory Interstate Recognition of Same-Sex Adoptions,” 19 Tulane Journal of Law & Sexuality 137 (2010)
  • “In the Manner Prescribed by the State”: Potential Challenges to State-Enforced Hospital Limitations on Childbirth Options, 16 Cardozo Journal of Law & Gender 469 (2010)
  • Comment, “Protecting Pregnant Women: A Guide to Successfully Challenging Criminal Child Abuse Prosecutions of Pregnant Drug Addicts,” 99 Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology 823 (2009)

Presentations

  • “2016 Disability Employment Law Updates,” Bar Association of San Francisco, Disability Subcommittee of the Equality Committee, December 13, 2016
  • “Pleading, Winning, and Enforcing ADA Class Actions,” Bar Association of San Francisco, Disability Subcommittee of the Equality Committee, January 27, 2016
  • “2015 Disability Employment Law Updates,” Bar Association of San Francisco, Disability Subcommittee of the Equality Committee, December 8, 2015
  • “2016 Disability Employment Law Updates,” Bar Association of San Francisco, Disability Subcommittee of the Equality Committee, December 13, 2016
  • “Pleading, Winning, and Enforcing ADA Class Actions,” Bar Association of San Francisco, Disability Subcommittee of the Equality Committee, January 27, 2016
  • “2015 Disability Employment Law Updates,” Bar Association of San Francisco, Disability Subcommittee of the Equality Committee, December 8, 2015