Education

  • J.D., Stanford Law School, 2013.  President, Stanford Law Review
  • B.A., Brown University, cum laude, English and Political Science, 2006

Admissions

  • California (2013)
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T: 415-433-6830
F: 415-433-7104
E: chu@rbgg.com

Christopher Hu is an associate at Rosen Bien Galvan & Grunfeld LLP. He works on complex litigation and prelitigation matters in federal and state court. Mr. Hu also has experience representing clients in employment, First Amendment, disability rights, and criminal defense matters.

Mr. Hu is a graduate of Stanford Law School and Brown University. Prior to joining RBGG, he served as a law clerk to the Honorable Kim McLane Wardlaw of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and the Honorable Goodwin Liu of the California Supreme Court.

During law school, Mr. Hu served as President of the Stanford Law Review. He also participated in Stanford’s Supreme Court Litigation Clinic, where he worked on several briefs filed in the United States Supreme Court.

REPRESENTATIVE CASES
  • Armstrong v. Brown, 103 F. Supp. 3d 1070 (N.D. Cal. 2015).  Mr. Hu is part of a team of attorneys involved in this statewide class action under the Americans with Disabilities Act on behalf of all California prisoners and parolees with disabilities.  Almost two decades ago, RBGG proved in federal court that California’s prison system and Board of Prison Terms were systemically discriminating against prisoners and parolees with mobility, sight, hearing, learning, mental and kidney disabilities. See Armstrong v. Wilson, 942 F. Supp. 1252 (N.D. Cal. 1996), aff’d 124 F.3d 1019 (9th Cir. 1997).  The team’s current work includes tackling discrimination in assignments to valuable jobs and programs in prison, improving the difficult transition from prison to parole, and facilitating access to education and programs for prisoners with learning disabilities.  The Armstrong litigation has resulted in a series of ground-breaking precedents, including rulings that the ADA does not permit state government agencies to avoid compliance by delegating responsibilities to local governments, and that prisoners cannot be held in solitary confinement solely on account of disability.
Full bio »
vCard icon

Download vCard
T: 415-433-6830
F: 415-433-7104
E: chu@rbgg.com

Christopher Hu is an associate at Rosen Bien Galvan & Grunfeld LLP. He works on complex litigation and prelitigation matters in federal and state court. Mr. Hu also has experience representing clients in employment, First Amendment, disability rights, and criminal defense matters.

Mr. Hu is a graduate of Stanford Law School and Brown University. Prior to joining RBGG, he served as a law clerk to the Honorable Kim McLane Wardlaw of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and the Honorable Goodwin Liu of the California Supreme Court.

During law school, Mr. Hu served as President of the Stanford Law Review. He also participated in Stanford’s Supreme Court Litigation Clinic, where he worked on several briefs filed in the United States Supreme Court.

REPRESENTATIVE CASES
  • Armstrong v. Brown, 103 F. Supp. 3d 1070 (N.D. Cal. 2015).  Mr. Hu is part of a team of attorneys involved in this statewide class action under the Americans with Disabilities Act on behalf of all California prisoners and parolees with disabilities.  Almost two decades ago, RBGG proved in federal court that California’s prison system and Board of Prison Terms were systemically discriminating against prisoners and parolees with mobility, sight, hearing, learning, mental and kidney disabilities. See Armstrong v. Wilson, 942 F. Supp. 1252 (N.D. Cal. 1996), aff’d 124 F.3d 1019 (9th Cir. 1997).  The team’s current work includes tackling discrimination in assignments to valuable jobs and programs in prison, improving the difficult transition from prison to parole, and facilitating access to education and programs for prisoners with learning disabilities.  The Armstrong litigation has resulted in a series of ground-breaking precedents, including rulings that the ADA does not permit state government agencies to avoid compliance by delegating responsibilities to local governments, and that prisoners cannot be held in solitary confinement solely on account of disability.

Admissions

  • California (2013)

Professional Experience

  • Law Clerk for the Honorable Goodwin Liu, Supreme Court of California, 2014–2015
  • Law Clerk for the Honorable Kim McLane Wardlaw,  United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, 2013-2014

 

Christopher Hu is an associate at Rosen Bien Galvan & Grunfeld LLP. He works on complex litigation and prelitigation matters in federal and state court. Mr. Hu also has experience representing clients in employment, First Amendment, disability rights, and criminal defense matters.

Mr. Hu is a graduate of Stanford Law School and Brown University. Prior to joining RBGG, he served as a law clerk to the Honorable Kim McLane Wardlaw of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and the Honorable Goodwin Liu of the California Supreme Court.

During law school, Mr. Hu served as President of the Stanford Law Review. He also participated in Stanford’s Supreme Court Litigation Clinic, where he worked on several briefs filed in the United States Supreme Court.

REPRESENTATIVE CASES
  • Armstrong v. Brown, 103 F. Supp. 3d 1070 (N.D. Cal. 2015).  Mr. Hu is part of a team of attorneys involved in this statewide class action under the Americans with Disabilities Act on behalf of all California prisoners and parolees with disabilities.  Almost two decades ago, RBGG proved in federal court that California’s prison system and Board of Prison Terms were systemically discriminating against prisoners and parolees with mobility, sight, hearing, learning, mental and kidney disabilities. See Armstrong v. Wilson, 942 F. Supp. 1252 (N.D. Cal. 1996), aff’d 124 F.3d 1019 (9th Cir. 1997).  The team’s current work includes tackling discrimination in assignments to valuable jobs and programs in prison, improving the difficult transition from prison to parole, and facilitating access to education and programs for prisoners with learning disabilities.  The Armstrong litigation has resulted in a series of ground-breaking precedents, including rulings that the ADA does not permit state government agencies to avoid compliance by delegating responsibilities to local governments, and that prisoners cannot be held in solitary confinement solely on account of disability.

Education

  • J.D., Stanford Law School, 2013.  President, Stanford Law Review
  • B.A., Brown University, cum laude, English and Political Science, 2006